October 3, 2012

Entrustment: Risk on the Road

When risk managers scan the virtually infinite horizon of risk, they often overlook the single greatest exposure in the working world: driving cars and trucks on the roads of America. Today we approach the issue through the back door, wherein an individual killed in an accident was deemed not be in the course and scope of employment. It might be the backdoor, but it still leads to the same conclusion.

Linda Gadbois was a cook for the California prison system. She suffered a work-related injury and was sent to a doctor. When this doctor proved unsatisfactory, she was allowed to choose another medical provider from a list. After completing her appointment in May of 2008, she headed back to work. She was involved in an accident: Gadbois was killed; the other driver, Kenneth Fields, was seriously injured. Under the theory that Gadbois was "in the course and scope" of employment, Fields sued Gadbois and the state of California, her employer. No need to ask why: the state's pockets were significantly deeper than those of the late Gadbois.

Going to Work
Field's case rested on the interpretation of the "coming and going" rule: was Gadbois, leaving a medical facility after work-related treatment, inside or outside of employment? The court noted that she had requested the second treatment on her own. Her employer did not require her to drive to the appointment, nor was she required to drive as part of her employment. As a prison cook, the essential job functions were limited to her cooking: how she got to work was not her employer's concern.

As a result, the fifth district appeals court concluded that the state was not liable for any injuries Gadbois caused while on her way to work. Field's suit against the state was dismissed; the status of his suit against Gadbois is not known, though presumably he collected up to the limits of her personal auto insurance policy.

It is worth noting that Gadbois's death was not compensable under workers comp. Gadbois was paid for the day of her death in accordance with a death benefit policy that covers all workers who die on a regular work day, whether at work, on the way to work, or on paid vacation or leave. Gadbois received her full salary for the day of the accident, but received nothing from workers' comp. Had she received death benefits under comp, Fields would have had a stronger case.

Drivers: Good, Bad and Indifferent
While the specific circumstances proved Gadbois to be the exception, many people do drive in the course and scope of employment: obvious examples would be tradesmen, salespeople on the road and people whose customers are visited in their homes. But the circle of drivers must be expanded to include any and all employees who run errands or perform any aspect of their jobs in company cars or in personal vehicles.

Some employees do this company-related driving on a regular basis; others only sporadically. But any employee driving "in the course and scope" of employment is a representative of the employer. Whether consciously or not, the employer has endorsed the driving skills of employees whose work involves driving. Even if the employee is in a personal vehicle, the employer has, in effect, entrusted them with the keys. This "entrustment" may well comprise the riskiest part of the working day.

Basic Management
How should employers manage this risk? It's really quite simple. Any and all employees who drive - or who might possibly drive - while working should be required to submit annual copies of their driving records. If there is a cost in obtaining the records, the employee should be reimbursed. The employer should review the records carefully and place restrictions on any employees with marginal or poor driving records. Indeed, the employer may well find that some employees who drive while working do not hold valid licenses. If these unlicensed drivers have accidents while working, the employer is on the hook for anything that happens.

In addition, employees should be required to report any moving violations, on or off the job. A speeding violation on the weekend might not preclude an employee from driving during work, but a formal warning would be appropriate.

Finally, prudent employers should have written policies on limiting the use of cell phones while driving and, needless to add, prohibiting texting. These policies should be enforced, with appropriate documentation and disciplinary action for any violations.

The risks of driving permeate our lives. When we drive in the course of work, the risks are shared by employee and employer alike, even if the latter is oblivious to the exposure. For the savvy manager, a well organized approach to the risks of driving goes a long way toward containing the ever-present perils of the open road.

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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Jon Coppelman published on October 3, 2012 2:10 PM.

News roundup: Risk, Dispensing Docs, Costs for Employees, Litigation & more was the previous entry in this blog.

Compensable Meningitis? is the next entry in this blog.

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