March 13, 2012

New study reveals occupational chemical exposure risks for nurses' reproductive health

Female nurses who have occupational exposure to sterilizing agents and chemotherapy drugs are at least twice as likely to have miscarriages as those who do not have such exposure. Elizabeth Grossman of The Pump Handle offers a summary of a recent study on chemical exposures and nurses' reproductive health, which was conducted by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, and Brigham and Women's Hospital. The study encompassed more than 7,000 female nurses.

Grossman notes:

Similar effects have been reported before, but this is one of the largest studies ever to look at these exposures, explained Christina Lawson, a reproductive epidemiologist with NIOSH and study author. Because these results reflect adjustment for a number of variables -- including age, hours worked, and shift-work -- and because the study was designed to avoid overestimation, its findings may be conservative, said Lawson.

While further studies are needed to determine the exact chemical exposures, high on the suspect list are a variety of chemicals used to disinfect medical equipment and surgical instruments, such as formaldehyde and ethylene oxide. In her post, Grossman also talks about the dangers of formaldehyde exposure to beauty salon workers, an issue that was a recent NIOSH Science blog focus: Hair, Formaldehyde, and Industrial Hygiene. Both the Food & Drug Administration and OSHA have issued particular warnings about the Brazilian Blowout, a highly popular hair straightening treatment.

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This page contains a single entry by Julie Ferguson published on March 13, 2012 2:51 PM.

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